Tuesday, February 28, 2006

Ship Life Boat Concept: Submersible Safety Life Boats in the High Seas

Hi All,

I recently saw a documentary program on workers at sea that help steer away icebergs from oil drilling platforms in the north Atlantic seas. Where they stated if a mariner falls into those frigid waters that in 10 minutes they are as good as dead if not rescued.

What if besides those typical inflatable deployable rafts in an emergency a ship uses. Or the deployable smaller life boats cruiseliners use that are often to the sides of a ship with lowering cranes.

That a variety of life boats is introduced that is a submersible life boat for those oceans where waves are commonly over 12 feet. Akin to a life boat that can be submerged in water for prolonged periods without drowning the survivors. Those that specialize in submersible submarines can create a larger passenger model. The submersible can be deployed either via those mini-yacht life boats that launch from via the cranes. Or where the newer cruise ships with a open ended lower aft for recreational water sport activities for passengers launch while at anchor. The submersible can be located there likewise instead of having lower floor passagener and crew race to the upper decks during a ships sinking emergency.

On a working ship in the high seas such as the one originally cited above in the north Atlantic seas. The submersible life boat can hang to an attached module to the bridge or some other commonly used corridor of the crew. That acts like a hallway while not in use much like a module would be used on the orbital space station platform. During a capsizing ship in the high seas it can be an emergency conduit used to escape to and launch for survival.

So a new outlook of passenger survival on a ship of any sort can be utilized for a submersible life boat variety. It's up to engineers and ship wrights if they wish to incorporate a similar concept for their ships.

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Amendum: The submersible life boats can also be attached to the ships hull. Either by the waterline or beneath it via a hatch like airlock connection per submersible on a cruise ship. Rather than attaching the submersible life boat via the cranes or aft of a ship as noted above.